Anger Assessment

 Check Out Our New Home!

4 Calgary locations

 403.263.5543   1.888.655.5495 

Coping with Change

Chronic Conditions

Clinical Hypnosis

Communication

Relationships
Introversion

Addictions

Career
Sports Psychology

Meditation Coaching

New Look for Anton Counseling & Health Psychology

Accepting you feel AngryNext. Once you're at the stage of acceptance you can now do something about it. It's not easy I know. However, following this program will make the process considerably easier for you. One thing you need to realize now is that feeling anger is normal. It may just be possible though, that what you're thinking of as anger, others may think of as out-of-control rage. No one is right and no one is wrong. There may be a perceptual misalignment.

 

 

 

Be aware of your anger warning signs and triggers

 

While you might feel that you just explode into anger without warning, in fact, there are physical warning signs in your body. Anger is a normal physical response. It fuels the “fight or flight” system of the body, and the angrier you get, the more your body goes into overdrive. Becoming aware of your own personal signs that your temper is starting to boil allows you to take steps to manage your anger before it gets out of control.

 

Pay attention to the way anger feels in your body

 

  • Knots in your stomach
  • Clenching your hands or jaw
  • Feeling clammy or flushed
  • Breathing faster
  • Headaches

 

  • Pacing or needing to walk around
  • "Seeing red"
  • Having trouble concentrating
  • Pounding heart
  • Tensing your shoulders

 

Identify the negative thought patterns that trigger your temper

 

You may think that external things—the insensitive actions of other people, for example, or frustrating situations—are what cause your anger. But anger problems have less to do with what happens to you than how you interpret and think about what happened. Common negative thinking patterns that trigger and fuel anger include:

 

  • Overgeneralizing. For example, "You ALWAYS interrupt me. You NEVER consider my needs. EVERYONE disrespects me. I NEVER get the credit I deserve."
  • Obsessing on "shoulds" and "musts." Having a rigid view of the way things should or must be and getting angry when reality doesn't line up with this vision.
  • Mind reading and jumping to conclusions. Assuming you "know" what someone else is thinking or feeling—that he or she intentionally upset you, ignored your wishes, or disrespected you.
  • Collecting straws. Looking for things to get upset about, usually while overlooking or blowing past anything positive. Letting these small irritations build and build until you reach the "final straw" and explode, often over something relatively minor.
  • Blaming. When anything bad happens or something goes wrong, it's always someone else's fault. You blame others for the things that happen to you rather than taking responsibility for your own life.

 

Avoid people, places, and situations that bring out your worst

 

Stressful events don’t excuse anger, but understanding how these events affect you can help you take control of your environment and avoid unnecessary aggravation. Look at your regular routine and try to identify activities, times of day, people, places, or situations that trigger irritable or angry feelings. Maybe you get into a fight every time you go out for drinks with a certain group of friends. Or maybe the traffic on your daily commute drives you crazy. Then think about ways to avoid these triggers or view the situation differently so it doesn’t make your blood boil.

 

 

1. Identify Triggers

Identifying factors that trigger feelings of anger is an important step in learning how to control reactions. This worksheet can help pinpoint those triggers.

 

 

anger trigger 

 

 

2. Understanding Your Triggers

 

While recognizing anger triggers is important, it's also important to explore the causes of those triggers. This worksheet helps you reflect on why certain situations lead to responses of anger.

understanding your triggers

 

Next Component 3

Controling Anger

Share this page